Advocacy in an Urban School District: A Work In Progress Historically, the role of school-based speech and language pa-thologists went beyond being a service provider. Speech-language pa-thologists were all things to all people. If a teacher needed a substitute, they were there to teach a class while she attended a conference. If a student needed tutoring in reading, pathologists ... Article
Article  |   April 01, 2001
Advocacy in an Urban School District: A Work In Progress
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Lynda S. Mayster
    Chicago Public Schools
  • Elizabeth A. Dailey
    Chicago Public Schools
Article Information
Articles
Article   |   April 01, 2001
Advocacy in an Urban School District: A Work In Progress
SIG 16 Perspectives on School-Based Issues, April 2001, Vol. 2, 23-26. doi:10.1044/sbi2.1.23
SIG 16 Perspectives on School-Based Issues, April 2001, Vol. 2, 23-26. doi:10.1044/sbi2.1.23
Historically, the role of school-based speech and language pa-thologists went beyond being a service provider. Speech-language pa-thologists were all things to all people. If a teacher needed a substitute, they were there to teach a class while she attended a conference. If a student needed tutoring in reading, pathologists gave up lunch and helped with phonics or vocabulary enrichment. If an aide were absent, pathologists assisted with bus and lunch duty. Pathologists went beyond the stated job description, if there was an actual job description. Now, it is time for speech-language pathologists to problem solve and advocate for both their students and for themselves.
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