A Discussion of Adverse Effects of Dysphagia on Education for Children With Feeding and Swallowing Disorders In order to begin to examine the issue of adverse effects of dysphagia on education, it is important to look first at the impact of the feeding process on overall development. The impact is huge and pervasive. To understand the relationship between feeding and development, one must go back to ... Article
Article  |   July 01, 2002
A Discussion of Adverse Effects of Dysphagia on Education for Children With Feeding and Swallowing Disorders
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Randy Moskowitz Kurjan
    Montgomery County Public Schools, Rockville, MD
Article Information
Swallowing, Dysphagia & Feeding Disorders / School-Based Settings / Articles
Article   |   July 01, 2002
A Discussion of Adverse Effects of Dysphagia on Education for Children With Feeding and Swallowing Disorders
SIG 16 Perspectives on School-Based Issues, July 2002, Vol. 3, 24-26. doi:10.1044/sbi3.2.24
SIG 16 Perspectives on School-Based Issues, July 2002, Vol. 3, 24-26. doi:10.1044/sbi3.2.24
In order to begin to examine the issue of adverse effects of dysphagia on education, it is important to look first at the impact of the feeding process on overall development. The impact is huge and pervasive. To understand the relationship between feeding and development, one must go back to the neonatal period or even earlier, since sucking begins prenatally. The synchrony of sucking, swallowing, and breathing is a rhythmic, life-sustaining dance. Sucking is perhaps the single most basic, organizing behavior in which human beings engage. It provides our earliest mode of regulation. According to Dr. Stanley Greenspan, the first stage in organizing behavior and furthering development is “the achievement of homeostasis, that is, self-regulation and emerging interest in the world through sight, sound, smell, touch, and taste” (Greenspan, 1992, p. 729). If the feeding process is disturbed in some way or for some reason (for example, if the timing is off, even slightly), the infant becomes disorganized and feeding becomes very arduous. There may be failure to thrive because of diminished nutritional intake or even respiratory complications secondary to aspiration. Failure to thrive may be organic (caused by sensory, physiological, or anatomical differences) or non-organic (caused by social-emotional or attachment issues).
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