Adverse Effect: Not a Big Issue in Minnesota Meeting the requirements of adverse effect has not been a significant issue in Minnesota when considering special education for speech-language services. This is mainly due to the use of strict eligibility criteria. Minnesota has eligibility criteria for articulation, language, voice, and fluency that contain a built-in requirement for significant effect ... Article
Article  |   July 01, 2002
Adverse Effect: Not a Big Issue in Minnesota
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Connie Hinnerichs
    South St. Paul Public Schools, South St. Paul, MN
  • Mary Garrison
    South St. Paul Public Schools, South St. Paul, MN
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Voice Disorders / School-Based Settings / Language Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Articles
Article   |   July 01, 2002
Adverse Effect: Not a Big Issue in Minnesota
SIG 16 Perspectives on School-Based Issues, July 2002, Vol. 3, 29-30. doi:10.1044/sbi3.2.29
SIG 16 Perspectives on School-Based Issues, July 2002, Vol. 3, 29-30. doi:10.1044/sbi3.2.29
Meeting the requirements of adverse effect has not been a significant issue in Minnesota when considering special education for speech-language services. This is mainly due to the use of strict eligibility criteria. Minnesota has eligibility criteria for articulation, language, voice, and fluency that contain a built-in requirement for significant effect on communication as determined by the educational speech-language pathologist and at least one other person. The criteria also represent very significant delays/disorders in the respective areas.
Doesn’t having such strict criteria limit the ability to see students who could benefit from the services of a speech-language pathologist?
It is the interpretation of the state of Minnesota that the students who receive special education services must represent those with very significant delays/disorders, not just those who can benefit from therapy. This is also true of criteria in disability areas other than speech-language as well. For the most part, the educational speech-language pathologists are working with the most severe cases of speech-language impairment. This appears to actually help keep caseloads down, but the needs of the students are proportionately higher.
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