CAPD and School Age Children: Everything Old Is New Again Some of us “vintage” members remember when auditory training, and auditory processing were topics for discussion in training seminars, practicum classes, and courses in “childhood aphasia.” That was back in the ‘70s. The history of central auditory disorders spans 50 years of scientific and clinical developments. It was the work ... Article
Article  |   October 01, 2002
CAPD and School Age Children: Everything Old Is New Again
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Donna Geffner
    Speech and Hearing Center, St. John's University, Jamaica, NY
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / School-Based Settings / Language Disorders / Articles
Article   |   October 01, 2002
CAPD and School Age Children: Everything Old Is New Again
SIG 16 Perspectives on School-Based Issues, October 2002, Vol. 3, 17-19. doi:10.1044/sbi3.3.17
SIG 16 Perspectives on School-Based Issues, October 2002, Vol. 3, 17-19. doi:10.1044/sbi3.3.17
Some of us “vintage” members remember when auditory training, and auditory processing were topics for discussion in training seminars, practicum classes, and courses in “childhood aphasia.” That was back in the ‘70s. The history of central auditory disorders spans 50 years of scientific and clinical developments. It was the work of Bocca, Calearo, and Cassinari (1954)  and other colleagues who reported central auditory nervous system dysfunction in adults. Its presence in children emerged in the 60s and 70s, although with little neurologic markings. A 1977 conference stimulated interest in pediatric CAPD. At that time, a plethora of programs to enhance listening skills in young and early elementary school-aged children emerged. There were the DLM tapes, as described by Keith (1977), of Auditory Skills—all five sets: Auditory Discrimination, Auditory Imagery, Auditory Memory, Auditory Figure Ground Listening, Auditory Motor (sequential). There were the “PEP” tapes, Auditory Perceptual Training tapes, and “Sounds of the World” also described by Keith (1977) . A recent personal communication with Ron Goldman brought to light how much we addressed auditory processing 30 years ago. His test, the Goldman-Fristoe-Woodcock “Test of Auditory Selective Attention,” although out-of print, and over 30 years old, is still used by some today. The premise remains the same, the names have changed. There are children who have difficulty listening, especially in noisy or competing conditions. In some cases, these children do fine on speech discrimination tests in an audiometric booth, but they “mishear” when you converse with them. What is of current interest is how many of these children are poor readers.
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