Working With Children Who Have Cochlear Implants For increasing numbers of children with profound hearing loss, multichannel cochlear implants have become the treatment of choice. Traditionally, self-contained classrooms and schools for the deaf have been the most common educational placements for children with a profound hearing loss. Mainstreaming in regular education programs is occurring more frequently and ... Article
Article  |   October 01, 2002
Working With Children Who Have Cochlear Implants
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Susan F. Erler
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL
Article Information
Hearing Aids, Cochlear Implants & Assistive Technology / School-Based Settings / Articles
Article   |   October 01, 2002
Working With Children Who Have Cochlear Implants
SIG 16 Perspectives on School-Based Issues, October 2002, Vol. 3, 19-24. doi:10.1044/sbi3.3.19
SIG 16 Perspectives on School-Based Issues, October 2002, Vol. 3, 19-24. doi:10.1044/sbi3.3.19
For increasing numbers of children with profound hearing loss, multichannel cochlear implants have become the treatment of choice. Traditionally, self-contained classrooms and schools for the deaf have been the most common educational placements for children with a profound hearing loss. Mainstreaming in regular education programs is occurring more frequently and at earlier ages among children with cochlear implants. Speech-language pathologists who in the past rarely provided services to children with profound hearing loss need to prepare for the likelihood that children with cochlear implants will be a part of their caseload.
Several factors have changed during the 10 years since the FDA approved the use of cochlear implants in children. Speech processing strategies have evolved to provide more complete speech information. Programming options provide the audiologist greater flexibility in adjusting each child’s MAP or individually determined set of thresholds and comfortable listening levels. Children are being implanted at younger ages, increasing auditory capacity during the critical period of language development. Children with residual hearing who demonstrate good closed-set speech perception with hearing aids are being implanted and demonstrate significant benefit from the device. Finally, as evidence mounts for the benefit of oral/aural treatment and education for implanted children, more schools are adding oral/aural communication options, while others are strengthening the role of auditory input and speech production in classes using total communication.
First Page Preview
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview ×
View Large
Become a SIG Affiliate
Pay Per View
Entire SIG 16 Perspectives on School-Based Issues content & archive
24-hour access
This Issue
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access
We've Changed Our Publication Model...
The 19 individual SIG Perspectives publications have been relaunched as the new, all-in-one Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups.