Pediatric Cochlear Implant Update and the Value of a Team Approach Now that cochlear implants are more commonplace in children, the need for communication between the implant center, service providers, and schools is critical to insure achieving the outcome that was hoped for. Continuous and meaningful support for these children requires ongoing education for all of the adults involved in their ... Article
Article  |   October 01, 2002
Pediatric Cochlear Implant Update and the Value of a Team Approach
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Kerry Roesch
    Children's Memorial Hospital, Chicago, IL
Article Information
Hearing Aids, Cochlear Implants & Assistive Technology / School-Based Settings / Articles
Article   |   October 01, 2002
Pediatric Cochlear Implant Update and the Value of a Team Approach
SIG 16 Perspectives on School-Based Issues, October 2002, Vol. 3, 24-28. doi:10.1044/sbi3.3.24
SIG 16 Perspectives on School-Based Issues, October 2002, Vol. 3, 24-28. doi:10.1044/sbi3.3.24
Now that cochlear implants are more commonplace in children, the need for communication between the implant center, service providers, and schools is critical to insure achieving the outcome that was hoped for. Continuous and meaningful support for these children requires ongoing education for all of the adults involved in their care. Providing quality services for these children, as a team working together, is the best way I have found to support the family in their process.
As a pediatric audiologist working at a large cochlear implant center, I am aware of the profound impact advances in technology are having on deaf children and their families. There is an increased awareness of the advantages of early identification and intervention for a child born with hearing loss. The most significant outcome is a reduction in the language delay commonly seen with children identified later. Also, the efficacy of cochlear implantation in children has continued to improve significantly over time resulting in FDA recommendations for implantation broadening to include children as young as 12 months of age and children with lesser degrees of hearing loss. As a result, cochlear implant centers are seeing an influx of infants and school-age children who now qualify for cochlear implantation. It is an exciting and challenging time for professionals working with these children and their potential for improved communication.
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