Phonemic Awareness Skills Training: An Early Intervention Program For Kindergartners The purpose of this article is to describe a successful early intervention program used in a public school setting that provides identification and intervention for kindergarten children with weak phonological awareness skills. Numerous studies have documented the strong correlation between phonemic awareness and reading mastery. In fact, phonological awareness ... Article
Article  |   April 01, 2003
Phonemic Awareness Skills Training: An Early Intervention Program For Kindergartners
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Regina Buckley
    Tanque Verde Unified School District, Tucson, AZ
  • Scott King
    Tanque Verde Unified School District, Tucson, AZ
Article Information
Development / Special Populations / Early Identification & Intervention / School-Based Settings / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Articles
Article   |   April 01, 2003
Phonemic Awareness Skills Training: An Early Intervention Program For Kindergartners
SIG 16 Perspectives on School-Based Issues, April 2003, Vol. 4, 30-33. doi:10.1044/sbi4.1.30
SIG 16 Perspectives on School-Based Issues, April 2003, Vol. 4, 30-33. doi:10.1044/sbi4.1.30
The purpose of this article is to describe a successful early intervention program used in a public school setting that provides identification and intervention for kindergarten children with weak phonological awareness skills.
Numerous studies have documented the strong correlation between phonemic awareness and reading mastery. In fact, phonological awareness is considered one of the single best indicators of how well children will learn to read in the first 2 years of instruction (Share, Jorm, Maclean, & Matthews, 1984). Children with weak phonological awareness skills in kindergarten may be at risk for difficulty learning to read. Unfortunately, traditional discrepancy models fail to recognize deficits in phonological awareness in kindergarten. Thus, support for children with these deficits may not be provided until a criterion of failure has been met. This often does not occur until third grade or later. Students with poor initial reading skills will have difficulty catching up to the reading level of their peers even if intense intervention is initiated later (Good lll, Simmons, & Smith, 1998). Clearly, early identification and intervention for students with weak phonological awareness skills are critical components of their successful mastery of reading.
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