Magnets, Minerals, and More: Including Science Curriculum in Language Goals This article provides an overview of how a regular education science curriculum was used to meet speech and language goals. Through adaptations of the regular education science curriculum, a fourth grade student learned new science vocabulary, comparison skills, descriptive skills, observation skills, classification skills, and the importance of steps ... Article
Article  |   April 01, 2003
Magnets, Minerals, and More: Including Science Curriculum in Language Goals
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Kathleen J. Levan
    Stockton Community Unit School District #206, Stockton, IL
Article Information
School-Based Settings / Professional Issues & Training / Language Disorders / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Articles
Article   |   April 01, 2003
Magnets, Minerals, and More: Including Science Curriculum in Language Goals
SIG 16 Perspectives on School-Based Issues, April 2003, Vol. 4, 37-39. doi:10.1044/sbi4.1.37
SIG 16 Perspectives on School-Based Issues, April 2003, Vol. 4, 37-39. doi:10.1044/sbi4.1.37
This article provides an overview of how a regular education science curriculum was used to meet speech and language goals. Through adaptations of the regular education science curriculum, a fourth grade student learned new science vocabulary, comparison skills, descriptive skills, observation skills, classification skills, and the importance of steps in a process. Using adaptations and vocabulary and language activities as the means of meeting the her language goals enabled the student to remain in the regular education classroom during science.
The student initially was identified as mentally retarded and speech and language impaired on her Individual Education Plan (IEP). She received all of her math and language instruction in the special education resource room. The student also had the benefit of a one-on-one teaching assistant. In an effort to enable the student to spend more time in the regular education classroom, staff decided at the annual review of her IEP that she would remain in the classroom for both science and social studies. It was also agreed that the special education resource room teacher would adapt the social studies curriculum and that the speech-language pathologist would adapt the science curriculum.
First Page Preview
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview ×
View Large
Become a SIG Affiliate
Pay Per View
Entire SIG 16 Perspectives on School-Based Issues content & archive
24-hour access
This Issue
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access
We've Changed Our Publication Model...
The 19 individual SIG Perspectives publications have been relaunched as the new, all-in-one Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups.