Collaborative or Pull-Out Intervention: Practice and Progress at One Elementary School ASHA (2000)  National Outcomes Measurement data indicated 90% of children with language disorders and 97% of children with articulation disorders were treated with pull-out as the primary service delivery model in the schools setting. Surveys by Elksnin and Capilouto (1994), Beck and Dennis (1997), and Paramboukas, Calvert, and Throneburg ... Article
Article  |   April 01, 2003
Collaborative or Pull-Out Intervention: Practice and Progress at One Elementary School
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Lynn Calvert
    Eastern Illinois University, Charleston, IL
  • Rebecca Throneburg
    Eastern Illinois University, Charleston, IL
  • Courtney Kocher
    Eastern Illinois University, Charleston, IL
  • Pamela Davidson
    Eastern Illinois University, Charleston, IL
  • Pamela Paul
    Charleston Community School District #1, Charleston, IL
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / School-Based Settings / Language Disorders / Articles
Article   |   April 01, 2003
Collaborative or Pull-Out Intervention: Practice and Progress at One Elementary School
SIG 16 Perspectives on School-Based Issues, April 2003, Vol. 4, 8-13. doi:10.1044/sbi4.1.8
SIG 16 Perspectives on School-Based Issues, April 2003, Vol. 4, 8-13. doi:10.1044/sbi4.1.8
ASHA (2000)  National Outcomes Measurement data indicated 90% of children with language disorders and 97% of children with articulation disorders were treated with pull-out as the primary service delivery model in the schools setting. Surveys by Elksnin and Capilouto (1994), Beck and Dennis (1997), and Paramboukas, Calvert, and Throneburg (1998)  found that approximately 58% of speech-language pathologists use an integrated service delivery model, while 42% had not adopted an integrated model. Speech-language pathologists spent an average of 2 hours per week in classroom, while the rest of their treatment was provided in pull-out. Noted advantages of classroom-based intervention included: students learn from their peers, a greater opportunity for reinforcement, and carryover of newly learned skills increased. Noted disadvantages of classroom-based intervention included: coordinating planning time for intervention and difficulty targeting children’s specific speech-language goals.
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