No Child Left Behind: State-to-State Variability Historically, public education in the United States has been locally controlled. For nearly 200 years, until 1963, there was no federal role; then came President Johnson’s War on Poverty and the creation of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA, recently renamed the No Child Left Behind Act or ... Article
Article  |   March 01, 2004
No Child Left Behind: State-to-State Variability
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Lissa Power-deFur
    Virginia Office of Education, Richmond, VA
Article Information
School-Based Settings / Regulatory, Legislative & Advocacy / Articles
Article   |   March 01, 2004
No Child Left Behind: State-to-State Variability
SIG 16 Perspectives on School-Based Issues, March 2004, Vol. 5, 10-12. doi:10.1044/sbi5.1.10
SIG 16 Perspectives on School-Based Issues, March 2004, Vol. 5, 10-12. doi:10.1044/sbi5.1.10
Historically, public education in the United States has been locally controlled. For nearly 200 years, until 1963, there was no federal role; then came President Johnson’s War on Poverty and the creation of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA, recently renamed the No Child Left Behind Act or NCLB). As the federal role in public education began, it provided funds to supplement state and local efforts, in an effort to encourage the creation of new programs. Target populations were those less served (e.g., students in poverty, students with disabilities). The programs were discretionary; state and local governments could elect to participate. The US has historically backed away from increased federal role in public education, as noted by the strong resistance to establishing national education goals in the Clinton administration’s Goals 2000 Act.
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