The SLP's Role in Increasing Student Achievement: Looking Beyond the Field of Speech-Language Pathology The No Child Left Behind Act was passed by Congress in 2001 and signed into law by President Bush on January 8, 2002. The law has as its foundation, a focus on accountability for improving student achievement, increased flexibility and local control for school systems, expanded parental options, and ... Article
Article  |   March 01, 2004
The SLP's Role in Increasing Student Achievement: Looking Beyond the Field of Speech-Language Pathology
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Debbie Lozo
    Speech-Language Program Cobb County Schools, Marietta, GA
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / School-Based Settings / Articles
Article   |   March 01, 2004
The SLP's Role in Increasing Student Achievement: Looking Beyond the Field of Speech-Language Pathology
SIG 16 Perspectives on School-Based Issues, March 2004, Vol. 5, 12-14. doi:10.1044/sbi5.1.12
SIG 16 Perspectives on School-Based Issues, March 2004, Vol. 5, 12-14. doi:10.1044/sbi5.1.12
The No Child Left Behind Act was passed by Congress in 2001 and signed into law by President Bush on January 8, 2002. The law has as its foundation, a focus on accountability for improving student achievement, increased flexibility and local control for school systems, expanded parental options, and data-driven, research based instruction. The law operates on the basic assumption that every child—regardless of income, gender, race, ethnicity, or disability—can learn (NCLB Act, 2001).
As school systems develop plans to address the Annual Yearly Progress requirements of NCLB, many are turning to national experts for guidance in how to improve student achievement. Many national experts are recommending that schools use research that has been collected on practices used in effective schools. This scientifically based research provides information on the strategies that best improve student achievement and have been implemented in schools that have a high percentage of students on grade level. Many of these strategies relate directly to language skills and are strategies that speech-language pathologists frequently use (Thompson, 2002b; Marzano, 2001, Reeves, 2000).
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