Addressing 10 Sources of Phonemic and Print Awareness During Storybook Reading Development of phonemic awareness involves becoming consciously aware of the speech sounds that make up words. This is an important ability in learning to read and write English because of the manner in which print refers to phonemes. Early researchers and interventionists considered phonemic awareness to be a unitary ... Article
Article  |   June 01, 2004
Addressing 10 Sources of Phonemic and Print Awareness During Storybook Reading
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Paul R. Hoffman
    Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA
  • Janet A. Norris
    Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA
Article Information
Development / School-Based Settings / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Articles
Article   |   June 01, 2004
Addressing 10 Sources of Phonemic and Print Awareness During Storybook Reading
SIG 16 Perspectives on School-Based Issues, June 2004, Vol. 5, 12-16. doi:10.1044/sbi5.2.12
SIG 16 Perspectives on School-Based Issues, June 2004, Vol. 5, 12-16. doi:10.1044/sbi5.2.12
Development of phonemic awareness involves becoming consciously aware of the speech sounds that make up words. This is an important ability in learning to read and write English because of the manner in which print refers to phonemes. Early researchers and interventionists considered phonemic awareness to be a unitary ability whose development enabled a child to start learning about print (Bradley & Bryant, 1983, 1985; Juel, 1988). However, as the study of phonemic awareness progressed, it was found that a variety of tasks could be used to measure phonemic awareness, including providing rhyming words (Goswami & Bryant, 1990); parsing sentences into words, words into syllables, and syllables into sounds (Sawyer, 1987); and counting the number of sounds in a word (Yopp, 1988) . These various tasks appear to represent a developmental progression with some being easily performed by preschoolers, while others are challenging to children in grade school. Training in these tasks is interrelated with development of print abilities as seen in a meta-analysis of 52 studies showing that phonemic awareness training that utilizes letter symbols improved the reading and spelling abilities of a variety of populations of children more than training in phonemic awareness without reference to print (Ehri et al., 2001) .
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