Research in Public Schools: Help Wanted Most, if not all, speech-language pathologists employed in public school settings have participated in a research course at some point during their graduate education. The intent of requiring such a research course is to promote future clinicians to being informed and critical consumers of the professional literature and to ... Article
Article  |   December 01, 2006
Research in Public Schools: Help Wanted
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Barb Bain
    Kasiska School of Health Professions, Idaho State University, Pocatello, ID
Article Information
School-Based Settings / Professional Issues & Training / Articles
Article   |   December 01, 2006
Research in Public Schools: Help Wanted
SIG 16 Perspectives on School-Based Issues, December 2006, Vol. 7, 14-20. doi:10.1044/sbi7.4.14
SIG 16 Perspectives on School-Based Issues, December 2006, Vol. 7, 14-20. doi:10.1044/sbi7.4.14
Most, if not all, speech-language pathologists employed in public school settings have participated in a research course at some point during their graduate education. The intent of requiring such a research course is to promote future clinicians to being informed and critical consumers of the professional literature and to encourage them to be active contributors to our professional body of knowledge.
Research, thus, should be an integral part of any clinical practice for several reasons. Most important, clinicians should base their clinical practice on existing research that allows best practices to be provided to clients with communication disorders. Clinicians can further use research methodology to address critical clinical decisions including who to treat, how to treat, and when to terminate treatment (Wambaugh & Bain, 2002). Research and clinical practice have a symbiotic relationship, that is, research underlies clinical practice and clinical practice provides future research questions. However, despite this relationship, there is often a huge gap between research and clinical practice. Several reasons may exist for this so-called gap. Perhaps clinicians do not think they have time to read research articles; or clinicians may not like to read research articles; or they may find the articles useless. Conversely, they may wish to participate in research but they do not know how to implement the research process. The integration of research with clinical practice ideally results in competent and creative services for clients with communication disorders. If clinicians would publish such integration, the professional literature would be expanded and generally improved.
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