Helping Typically Developing Children Who Can't Read: Modifying Instructional Language In 2000, the National Reading Panel (NRP)  released a report describing the research for evidencebased practice in reading instruction. That report included a discussion of the effectiveness of various instructional strategies. Many current programs include the elements of instruction identified as important in the report, but no single method ... Article
Article  |   December 01, 2006
Helping Typically Developing Children Who Can't Read: Modifying Instructional Language
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • M. A. Toner
    University of Arkansas, Fayetteville
  • Donna Helmer
    University of Arkansas, Fayetteville
Article Information
Development / School-Based Settings / Language Disorders / Reading & Writing Disorders / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Articles
Article   |   December 01, 2006
Helping Typically Developing Children Who Can't Read: Modifying Instructional Language
SIG 16 Perspectives on School-Based Issues, December 2006, Vol. 7, 3-6. doi:10.1044/sbi7.4.3
SIG 16 Perspectives on School-Based Issues, December 2006, Vol. 7, 3-6. doi:10.1044/sbi7.4.3
In 2000, the National Reading Panel (NRP)  released a report describing the research for evidencebased practice in reading instruction. That report included a discussion of the effectiveness of various instructional strategies. Many current programs include the elements of instruction identified as important in the report, but no single method was identified as most effective for all children. A common characteristic of several of the effective approaches is multimodality instruction. The literature suggests, however, that some children with reading disabilities may have difficulty integrating information that is presented to both the auditory and visual modalities (Blackburn, Bonvillian, & Ashby, 1984).
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