An Innovative Educational Approach for Addressing Articulation Differences San Diego City Schools educate a diverse population (43.4% Hispanic, 25.6% White, 16.6% Asian, and 13.9% African American; San Diego City Schools, 2006) of approximately 133,000 students at 216 educational facilities. It is the second largest district in California and the eighth largest urban district in the United States ... Article
Article  |   December 01, 2006
An Innovative Educational Approach for Addressing Articulation Differences
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jennifer Taps
    San Diego City Schools, San Diego, CA
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / School-Based Settings / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Articles
Article   |   December 01, 2006
An Innovative Educational Approach for Addressing Articulation Differences
SIG 16 Perspectives on School-Based Issues, December 2006, Vol. 7, 7-11. doi:10.1044/sbi7.4.7
SIG 16 Perspectives on School-Based Issues, December 2006, Vol. 7, 7-11. doi:10.1044/sbi7.4.7
San Diego City Schools educate a diverse population (43.4% Hispanic, 25.6% White, 16.6% Asian, and 13.9% African American; San Diego City Schools, 2006) of approximately 133,000 students at 216 educational facilities. It is the second largest district in California and the eighth largest urban district in the United States with 200 speech-language pathologists serving approximately 7,500 students with communication needs (San Diego City Schools, n.d.).
Like many speech-language pathologists, those in the San Diego City schools have challenging caseloads and limited time. Often this can necessitate serving only those with the most severe communication needs who cannot access the classroom curriculum. Despite these demands, speech-language pathologists in the San Diego City Schools District have found an effective way to meet the needs of traditional members of their caseload while at the same time serving children with single-sound errors. This year is the third year of reform in the area of articulation services in the district. Services for children with single-sound errors have shifted from special education to general education where they receive short-term services called the Speech Improvement Class. No Individualized Education Program (IEP) is required. This program has been successful for several reasons: continued administrative and staff support; ongoing professional development; and support via e-mail, phone calls, and site visits.
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