Early Intervening Services: Opportunities for Speech-Language Pathologists and the Students They Serve School-based speech-language pathologists have seen an ebb and flow of responsibilities and workloads over the years. Prior to the first iteration of special education law, The Education of All Handicapped Children Act of 1975 (EHA, commonly known as P.L. 94-142), SLPs had large caseloads upwards of 100 students. They ... Article
Article  |   March 01, 2007
Early Intervening Services: Opportunities for Speech-Language Pathologists and the Students They Serve
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Joan A. Mele-McCarthy
    The Summit School, Edgewater, MD
Article Information
Special Populations / Early Identification & Intervention / School-Based Settings / Articles
Article   |   March 01, 2007
Early Intervening Services: Opportunities for Speech-Language Pathologists and the Students They Serve
SIG 16 Perspectives on School-Based Issues, March 2007, Vol. 8, 14-21. doi:10.1044/sbi8.1.14
SIG 16 Perspectives on School-Based Issues, March 2007, Vol. 8, 14-21. doi:10.1044/sbi8.1.14
School-based speech-language pathologists have seen an ebb and flow of responsibilities and workloads over the years. Prior to the first iteration of special education law, The Education of All Handicapped Children Act of 1975 (EHA, commonly known as P.L. 94-142), SLPs had large caseloads upwards of 100 students. They worked with any child who had a speech articulation difficulty (mild to severe) and language difficulties. They screened all kindergarten children for speech and language difficulties, tested students, provided speech and language treatment to students, and worked with teachers doing all-class lessons for listening skills and public speaking.
Beginning with EHA 1975 and continuing with revised versions of this special education legislation up through the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act of 1997 (IDEA), speech-language pathologists’ work scope became more confined and prescribed: test students for speech and language difficulties, bring information to the individualized education program (IEP) team to determine eligibility for services, write IEPs, and provide services only to students who qualify for special education and related services. Speech-language pathology services have primarily been delivered in small group settings, either out of the classroom (pull-out) or in the classroom (push-in).
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