Shared Storybook Reading: Increasing Vocabulary Skills in an Inclusive Classroom Setting An ever-growing number of students across the United States experience academic achievement problems due to language deficits. The impact of language difficulties on academic success is particularly evident for children identified “atrisk” (e.g., children from low-income homes). With only one-quarter the vocabulary of their middle class peers, at-risk students ... Article
Article  |   March 01, 2005
Shared Storybook Reading: Increasing Vocabulary Skills in an Inclusive Classroom Setting
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Shannon Gormley
    Department of Educational and School Psychology and Special Education, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park
  • Kathy L. Ruhl
    Department of Educational and School Psychology and Special Education, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park
Article Information
Development / School-Based Settings / Articles
Article   |   March 01, 2005
Shared Storybook Reading: Increasing Vocabulary Skills in an Inclusive Classroom Setting
SIG 16 Perspectives on School-Based Issues, March 2005, Vol. 6, 11-14. doi:10.1044/sbi6.1.11
SIG 16 Perspectives on School-Based Issues, March 2005, Vol. 6, 11-14. doi:10.1044/sbi6.1.11
An ever-growing number of students across the United States experience academic achievement problems due to language deficits. The impact of language difficulties on academic success is particularly evident for children identified “atrisk” (e.g., children from low-income homes). With only one-quarter the vocabulary of their middle class peers, at-risk students are likely to start school behind and the gap between them and their “normally achieving peers” only grows larger (Hart & Risley, 1995) with the passage of time. Indeed, a particularly strong relationship exists between a child’s early vocabulary and their later literacy success (Catts, Fey, Zhang, & Tomblin, 1999; Snow, Burns, & Griffin, 1998). Young children with poor vocabulary skills are at significant risk for later reading difficulties. Consequently, children with language related difficulties make up over half the population of students served under IDEA (U.S. Department of Education, 2002).
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