Auditory Processing Disorders in Children: A Multidisciplinary Approach Language comprehension is essential for academic and social reasons. In order to understand language, one must relate sound to meaning. How we relate sound to meaning once sound has been detected is a complex neurological process involving the central auditory nervous system (CANS), a system with multiple components. Some ... Article
Article  |   March 01, 2005
Auditory Processing Disorders in Children: A Multidisciplinary Approach
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Marie R. Kerins
    Loyola College, Baltimore, MD
  • Donna Lynn Pitts
    Loyola College, Baltimore, MD
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / School-Based Settings / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Articles
Article   |   March 01, 2005
Auditory Processing Disorders in Children: A Multidisciplinary Approach
SIG 16 Perspectives on School-Based Issues, March 2005, Vol. 6, 20-24. doi:10.1044/sbi6.1.20
SIG 16 Perspectives on School-Based Issues, March 2005, Vol. 6, 20-24. doi:10.1044/sbi6.1.20
Language comprehension is essential for academic and social reasons. In order to understand language, one must relate sound to meaning. How we relate sound to meaning once sound has been detected is a complex neurological process involving the central auditory nervous system (CANS), a system with multiple components. Some children have difficulty processing linguistic information, resulting in an inability to integrate sound and meaning in order to comprehend language. Language disordered children often demonstrate difficulty with auditory perception, auditory processing, attention, and memory (Bamiou, Musiek, & Luxon, 2001; Bellis, 1996; Chermak, 2002; Smoski, Brunt, & Tannahil,1992). These factors inhibit language comprehension and academic success that require accurate perception of sound to translate language meaningfully. Researchers have suggested involvement of the CANS that result in a set of behaviors that underlie many language disorders (Bishop el al., 1999; Sloan, 1992; & Tallal, 1980). Auditory processing abilities can be determined through formal language testing and audiological assessment to identify deficits areas. Through collaborative testing between the speech-language pathologist and audiologist, test results can be used to profile individual children directing treatment approaches to best suit their individual needs.
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