Sensory Stimulation to Facilitate Language for Children in the Autism Spectrum The development of communication is partially dependent on the sensory experiences to which children are exposed during childhood. Individuals receive millions of sensations every minute; over time, they learn to integrate the various sensory sensations and respond appropriately to the stimulation (Kranowitz, 1998). An appropriate response implies normal functioning ... Article
Article  |   October 01, 2005
Sensory Stimulation to Facilitate Language for Children in the Autism Spectrum
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Gail Richard
    Communication Disorders & Sciences, Eastern Illinois University, Charleston, IL
Article Information
Special Populations / Autism Spectrum / School-Based Settings / Articles
Article   |   October 01, 2005
Sensory Stimulation to Facilitate Language for Children in the Autism Spectrum
SIG 16 Perspectives on School-Based Issues, October 2005, Vol. 6, 4-8. doi:10.1044/sbi6.3.4
SIG 16 Perspectives on School-Based Issues, October 2005, Vol. 6, 4-8. doi:10.1044/sbi6.3.4
The development of communication is partially dependent on the sensory experiences to which children are exposed during childhood. Individuals receive millions of sensations every minute; over time, they learn to integrate the various sensory sensations and respond appropriately to the stimulation (Kranowitz, 1998). An appropriate response implies normal functioning neurology during early development. A developmental disruption during the preschool years can result in a sensory integration dysfunction.
Children with sensory integration dysfunction experience problems responding appropriately to different sensory sensations. Autistic spectrum disorder (ASD) is an example of a syndrome disorder in which individuals frequently exhibit sensory integration dysfunction. The communication deficits that most children within ASD experience can be partially attributed to the poor organization of sensory input they are experiencing. Children with ASD may have difficulty integrating sensory input from any of the sensory systems, including auditory, visual, olfactory, gustatory, tactile, proprioceptive, or vestibular systems.
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