No SLP Left Behind: Definition and Demonstration of Our Key Role in Literacy Development The role of the school-based speech-language pathologist (SLP) is progressively changing and expanding. Educational reforms such as the 1997 reauthorization of IDEA and No Child Left Behind in 2001 have facilitated the discussion of accountability related to literacy instruction and the roles of various service providers. It is essential ... Article
Article  |   December 01, 2005
No SLP Left Behind: Definition and Demonstration of Our Key Role in Literacy Development
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Susan Conn
    Henderson County School System, Henderson, KY
  • Aleisha Sheridan Garten
    Henderson County School System, Henderson, KY
Article Information
School-Based Settings / Normal Language Processing / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Articles
Article   |   December 01, 2005
No SLP Left Behind: Definition and Demonstration of Our Key Role in Literacy Development
SIG 16 Perspectives on School-Based Issues, December 2005, Vol. 6, 3-7. doi:10.1044/sbi6.4.3
SIG 16 Perspectives on School-Based Issues, December 2005, Vol. 6, 3-7. doi:10.1044/sbi6.4.3
The role of the school-based speech-language pathologist (SLP) is progressively changing and expanding. Educational reforms such as the 1997 reauthorization of IDEA and No Child Left Behind in 2001 have facilitated the discussion of accountability related to literacy instruction and the roles of various service providers. It is essential for SLPs to clearly define and demonstrate their key role within the multifaceted realm of literacy development and instruction. ASHA released position statements outlining the principals of evidence-based practice (EBP) and the roles and responsibilities of the SLP in literacy development.
To ensure high quality services, EBP requires the integration of scientific evidence, SLP expertise, as well as the needs and preferences of clients served (ASHA, 2005a). EBP is also intended to improve clinical research and educational services. By helping to eradicate the clinic to practice gap, EBP ensures that empirical research is applied to practical service provision (Justice & Fey 2004) . The roles and responsibilities of the school-based SLP are generally defined as preventative through early identification; diagnostic via meaningful assessment; and remedial by means of scientifically-based intervention (ASHA, 2001). Furthermore, ASHA describes SLPs as highly qualified professionals with advanced knowledge of oral language development as it relates to the basis and reciprocal relationship to literacy development (2001).
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