Bullying, School-Based Speech-Language Pathologists, and English Language Learners: Seriousness, Intervention, and Strategy Selection Bullying in schools is a worldwide problem. School personnel, including speech-language pathologists (SLPs), play a critical role in the prevention of, and intervention in, bullying incidences. In this study, the authors examined SLPs' perceptions of bullying and endorsement of potential strategies for dealing with bullying as it relates to English ... Article
Article  |   December 01, 2011
Bullying, School-Based Speech-Language Pathologists, and English Language Learners: Seriousness, Intervention, and Strategy Selection
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Gordon W. Blood
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA
  • Laura A. Robins
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA
  • Ingrid M. Blood
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA
  • Michael P. Boyle
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA
  • Erinn H. Finke
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA
Article Information
Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / School-Based Settings / Articles
Article   |   December 01, 2011
Bullying, School-Based Speech-Language Pathologists, and English Language Learners: Seriousness, Intervention, and Strategy Selection
SIG 16 Perspectives on School-Based Issues, December 2011, Vol. 12, 128-138. doi:10.1044/sbi12.4.128
SIG 16 Perspectives on School-Based Issues, December 2011, Vol. 12, 128-138. doi:10.1044/sbi12.4.128
Abstract

Bullying in schools is a worldwide problem. School personnel, including speech-language pathologists (SLPs), play a critical role in the prevention of, and intervention in, bullying incidences. In this study, the authors examined SLPs' perceptions of bullying and endorsement of potential strategies for dealing with bullying as it relates to English language learners (ELLs). A survey was developed and mailed to 1,000 school-based SLPs. Eight vignettes describing unobserved and observed episodes of physical, verbal, relational, and cyber bullying were included. Survey data from 390 SLPs were analyzed. SLPs perceive physical, verbal, and cyber bullying as serious problems and report the likelihood of some type of intervention. In contrast, relational bullying (e.g., social exclusion, rejection) was rated less serious and likely to require less intervention. The majority of SLPs recommended ELLs should “try to blend in better,” “not be bothered by the bully,” “be more aggressive,” or “ignore the bully” when dealing with relational bullying. This study extends the literature on perceptions of school personnel, specifically SLPs, and their role in preventing student victimization. Many SLPs are likely to assist clients in dealing with physical, verbal, and cyber bullying, but may need further education regarding the seriousness of, and need for intervention in, relational bullying.

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