Protecting Brain Development: How Toxic Chemical Exposures Interact With Nutrition and Genetics to Put Children at Risk In the article “Protecting Children From Toxicants” in the November 2011 issue of The ASHA Leader, author Nancy Hepp outlined some of the substances and chemicals that can be most harmful to children's brain development and learning, providing guidance on ways to limit exposures. These neurotoxicants include pesticides, mercury, lead, ... Article
Article  |   August 01, 2012
Protecting Brain Development: How Toxic Chemical Exposures Interact With Nutrition and Genetics to Put Children at Risk
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Maureen Swanson
    Healthy Children Project, Learning Disabilities Association of America, Pittsburgh, PA
  • Nancy Hepp
    Collaborative on Health and the Environment, Bolinas, CA
  • Disclosure: Maureen Swanson has no financial or nonfinancial relationships related to the content of this article.
    Disclosure: Maureen Swanson has no financial or nonfinancial relationships related to the content of this article.×
  • Disclosure: Nancy Hepp is employed by the Collaborative on Health and the Environment.
    Disclosure: Nancy Hepp is employed by the Collaborative on Health and the Environment.×
Article Information
Development / Special Populations / Genetic & Congenital Disorders / Autism Spectrum / School-Based Settings / Articles
Article   |   August 01, 2012
Protecting Brain Development: How Toxic Chemical Exposures Interact With Nutrition and Genetics to Put Children at Risk
SIG 16 Perspectives on School-Based Issues, August 2012, Vol. 13, 54-59. doi:10.1044/sbi13.2.54
SIG 16 Perspectives on School-Based Issues, August 2012, Vol. 13, 54-59. doi:10.1044/sbi13.2.54
Abstract

In the article “Protecting Children From Toxicants” in the November 2011 issue of The ASHA Leader, author Nancy Hepp outlined some of the substances and chemicals that can be most harmful to children's brain development and learning, providing guidance on ways to limit exposures. These neurotoxicants include pesticides, mercury, lead, and solvents (industrial chemicals used in building finishes, adhesives, and cleaning products, as well as in cosmetics and personal care products). In this article, we expand on the current understanding of toxic exposures, especially as those exposures interact with nutrition and other aspects of children's environments.

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