Pediatric Brain Injury: Misconceptions, Challenges, and a Call To Reconceptualize our Role in the Schools Brain injury management in the pediatric population is a growing public health concern. Serving children with brain injuries in the schools presents a unique set of challenges and opportunities for speech-language pathologists (SLPs) and other professions providing clinical or educational services. We recently conducted a national survey of school-based SLPs ... Article
Article  |   November 01, 2012
Pediatric Brain Injury: Misconceptions, Challenges, and a Call To Reconceptualize our Role in the Schools
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Melissa C. Duff
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, Department of Neurology, Division of Cognitive Neuroscience University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA
  • Sarah Stuck
    Department of Neurology, Division of Cognitive Neuroscience, Iowa City, IA
Article Information
School-Based Settings / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Traumatic Brain Injury / Articles
Article   |   November 01, 2012
Pediatric Brain Injury: Misconceptions, Challenges, and a Call To Reconceptualize our Role in the Schools
SIG 16 Perspectives on School-Based Issues, November 2012, Vol. 13, 87-93. doi:10.1044/sbi13.3.87
SIG 16 Perspectives on School-Based Issues, November 2012, Vol. 13, 87-93. doi:10.1044/sbi13.3.87
Abstract

Brain injury management in the pediatric population is a growing public health concern. Serving children with brain injuries in the schools presents a unique set of challenges and opportunities for speech-language pathologists (SLPs) and other professions providing clinical or educational services. We recently conducted a national survey of school-based SLPs aimed at characterizing pediatric brain injury knowledge and management practices with a specific focus on concussion (Stuck & Duff, 2011). Drawing on results from our survey, this article will: 1) address the common misconception that young children are more resistant to or have better outcomes following brain injury than adults; 2) discuss the concept of delayed onset of symptoms following brain injury and the challenges this phenomenon presents in serving children with brain injury in the schools; and 3) discuss the role of the SLP in brain injury management in the schools and how changes to our approach to brain injury management in the schools may ultimately improve the quality of services to students recovering from brain injury.

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