Workload Status of School-Based Speech-Language Pathologists in Texas In 1993, the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA)  recommended caseloads of 40 for speech-language pathologists (SLPs) practicing in the public schools, a recommendation that was not feasible for most school districts. In addition, new laws and policies substantially increased the paperwork, responsibilities, and time expenditures required of the school-based SLP. ASHA ... Article
Article  |   December 01, 2012
Workload Status of School-Based Speech-Language Pathologists in Texas
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Erika Armstrong
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, Texas Woman's University, Denton, TX
  • Ginger White
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, Texas Woman's University, Denton, TX
  • Laura Moorer-Cook
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, Texas Woman's University, Denton, TX
  • Cindy Gill
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, Texas Woman's University, Denton, TX
  • Disclosure: Erika Armstrong has no financial or nonfinancial relationships related to the content of this article.
    Disclosure: Erika Armstrong has no financial or nonfinancial relationships related to the content of this article.×
  • Disclosure: Ginger White has no financial or nonfinancial relationships related to the content of this article.
    Disclosure: Ginger White has no financial or nonfinancial relationships related to the content of this article.×
  • Disclosure: Laura Moorer-Cook has no financial or nonfinancial relationships related to the content of this article.
    Disclosure: Laura Moorer-Cook has no financial or nonfinancial relationships related to the content of this article.×
  • Disclosure: Cindy Gill has no financial or nonfinancial relationships related to the content of this article.
    Disclosure: Cindy Gill has no financial or nonfinancial relationships related to the content of this article.×
Article Information
School-Based Settings / Professional Issues & Training / Articles
Article   |   December 01, 2012
Workload Status of School-Based Speech-Language Pathologists in Texas
SIG 16 Perspectives on School-Based Issues, December 2012, Vol. 13, 136-149. doi:10.1044/sbi13.4.136
SIG 16 Perspectives on School-Based Issues, December 2012, Vol. 13, 136-149. doi:10.1044/sbi13.4.136

In 1993, the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA)  recommended caseloads of 40 for speech-language pathologists (SLPs) practicing in the public schools, a recommendation that was not feasible for most school districts. In addition, new laws and policies substantially increased the paperwork, responsibilities, and time expenditures required of the school-based SLP. ASHA subsequently instigated extensive reviews of the problem and, in 2002, suggested that schools instead use a “workload analysis approach,” considering all of the required activities from prereferral to dismissal, in order to determine the number of children an SLP could appropriately serve. In our study, we attempted to catalog the status of Texas' efforts in using workload considerations. More than 400 school-based respondents indicated the percentages of time they spent fulfilling each professional responsibility at their school. Responses suggest that variation in caseload numbers corresponds to clinician role (SLP vs. supervising SLP vs. SLP Assistant). Most clinicians indicated that they were fairly satisfied with their job; however, many were employed 5 or fewer years in the schools and the average workweek was 48–49 hours. Although it appears that Texas is using workload considerations to some extent, efforts should continue to optimize the quality of treatment for Texas schoolchildren and retention of SLPs in the schools.

Become a SIG Affiliate
Pay Per View
Entire SIG 16 Perspectives on School-Based Issues content & archive
24-hour access
This Issue
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access
We've Changed Our Publication Model...
The 19 individual SIG Perspectives publications have been relaunched as the new, all-in-one Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups.