SLPs Then and Now: Keeping the Vision While Infusing Accountability and Function Incorporating literacy into the caseload of the school-based speech-language pathologist is often met with mixed feelings. This article explores the role of the speech-language pathologist (SLP) in the literacy arena from the mid 1970s to the present. It becomes apparent that SLPs have long recognized the relationship between the areas ... Article
Article  |   June 01, 2009
SLPs Then and Now: Keeping the Vision While Infusing Accountability and Function
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Marie R. Kerins
    Loyola College in Maryland
  • Karen Sheridan
    Carroll County Public Schools Maryland
  • Karen Feinberg
    Carroll County Public Schools Maryland
Article Information
Development / School-Based Settings / Normal Language Processing / Articles
Article   |   June 01, 2009
SLPs Then and Now: Keeping the Vision While Infusing Accountability and Function
SIG 16 Perspectives on School-Based Issues, June 2009, Vol. 10, 59-64. doi:10.1044/sbi10.2.59
SIG 16 Perspectives on School-Based Issues, June 2009, Vol. 10, 59-64. doi:10.1044/sbi10.2.59
Abstract

Incorporating literacy into the caseload of the school-based speech-language pathologist is often met with mixed feelings. This article explores the role of the speech-language pathologist (SLP) in the literacy arena from the mid 1970s to the present. It becomes apparent that SLPs have long recognized the relationship between the areas of language we are trained to address and an individual's ability to read and write. Changes have occurred over the last 25 years with an increase in research supporting the reciprocal relationship between language and literacy, a movement toward evidenced-based practice, and greater accountability regarding education and related service goals. While SLPs were exploring the language-literacy relationships several decades ago, current practice patterns demonstrate exemplary examples of collaboration with classroom teachers and SLPs. Two speech-language pathologists from a public school system in Maryland share how they have effectively worked on areas of prevention and intervention in a collaborative manner. Examples are also provided of “other roles” we often provide to general educators and families.

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