Interprofessional Approach to Auditory Processing Disorders Most of the school-aged children referred in audiology for the assessment of their central auditory functions are experiencing a variety of learning challenges. Research using neuroimaging techniques indicates that even the simplest auditory task like passive listening results in activation of multiple areas of the brain (Bellis, 2003). According to ... Article
Article  |   December 01, 2008
Interprofessional Approach to Auditory Processing Disorders
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Josée Lagacé
    Interprofessional Rehabilitation University Clinic, University of OttawaOttawa, Canada
  • Margaret Bélanger-Schaadt
    Interprofessional Rehabilitation University Clinic, University of OttawaOttawa, Canada
  • Jacinthe Savard
    Interprofessional Rehabilitation University Clinic, University of OttawaOttawa, Canada
  • Claire-Jehanne Dubouloz
    Interprofessional Rehabilitation University Clinic, University of OttawaOttawa, Canada
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / School-Based Settings / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Articles
Article   |   December 01, 2008
Interprofessional Approach to Auditory Processing Disorders
SIG 16 Perspectives on School-Based Issues, December 2008, Vol. 9, 140-150. doi:10.1044/sbi9.4.140
SIG 16 Perspectives on School-Based Issues, December 2008, Vol. 9, 140-150. doi:10.1044/sbi9.4.140
Abstract

Most of the school-aged children referred in audiology for the assessment of their central auditory functions are experiencing a variety of learning challenges. Research using neuroimaging techniques indicates that even the simplest auditory task like passive listening results in activation of multiple areas of the brain (Bellis, 2003). According to the same author, this interaction among different areas of the brain reflects an incredible degree of integration and interdependency throughout the central auditory nervous system. With that perspective in mind, interpretation of central auditory findings and intervention strategies should reflect this interdependency. The interprofessional approach—an approach that takes into account a child's auditory, language, learning, and associated characteristics—appears to ensure appropriate interpretation and management. This article illustrates an interprofessional model of intervention that is used to deliver services to school-aged children presenting with Auditory Processing Disorders (APD) and associated learning difficulties. The interprofessional team is composed of an audiologist, a speech-language pathologist (SLP), and an occupational therapist. This project is one of the initiatives at the Interprofessional University Clinic of the University of Ottawa (Canada) and has been implemented to provide rehabilitation services to children with APD using a framework based on social participation and interprofessionalism.

Acknowledgments
Special appreciation is expressed to the children who participated and shared and their experience. Special thanks to the students in Audiology, Speech-Language Pathology and Occupational Therapy who collaborated at the organization of the group sessions.
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