Perspectives on Preparing Graduate Students To Provide Services to Diverse Populations in Schools In today's school settings, speech-language pathologists are likely to engage in assessment, intervention, and consultation for students from culturally and linguistically diverse populations. Therefore, speech-language pathology graduate programs must make changes that will prepare monolingual and bilingual graduate students to meet the needs of these children. Graduate students can learn ... Article
Article  |   June 01, 2010
Perspectives on Preparing Graduate Students To Provide Services to Diverse Populations in Schools
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Rochel Lazewnik
    Communication Sciences and Disorders, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH
  • Nancy Creaghead
    Communication Sciences and Disorders, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH
  • Sandra Combs
    Communication Sciences and Disorders, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH
  • Lesley Raisor-Becker
    Communication Sciences and Disorders, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH
Article Information
Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / School-Based Settings / Professional Issues & Training / Articles
Article   |   June 01, 2010
Perspectives on Preparing Graduate Students To Provide Services to Diverse Populations in Schools
SIG 16 Perspectives on School-Based Issues, June 2010, Vol. 11, 33-39. doi:10.1044/sbi11.2.33
SIG 16 Perspectives on School-Based Issues, June 2010, Vol. 11, 33-39. doi:10.1044/sbi11.2.33
Abstract

In today's school settings, speech-language pathologists are likely to engage in assessment, intervention, and consultation for students from culturally and linguistically diverse populations. Therefore, speech-language pathology graduate programs must make changes that will prepare monolingual and bilingual graduate students to meet the needs of these children. Graduate students can learn information about cultural and linguistic diversity through independent courses and when these topics are incorporated into all courses. Practicum placements and experiences with children from culturally and linguistically diverse populations in the community can provide the necessary skills. When practicum experiences with diverse children are not available, faculty may consider simulated experiences, as well as experiences with typical speakers from other linguistic and cultural backgrounds.

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