Effects of School-Wide Intervention on Literacy Learning: The SLPs Support The speech-language pathologist (SLP) who works in an elementary school plays an integral part in the prevention, identification, assessment, and intervention of children who are learning to read and write (American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, 2001). This can be accomplished through the support of an SLP who has specialized knowledge in the ... Article
Article  |   March 2014
Effects of School-Wide Intervention on Literacy Learning: The SLPs Support
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Donna Thomas
    Southeastern Louisiana University, Hammond, LA
  • Dee M. Lance
    University of Central Arkansas, Conway, AR
  • Disclosures: Financial: Donna Thomas is an assistant professor in the Department of Health and Human Sciences at Southeastern Louisiana University. Dee M. Lance is an associate professor in the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders at the University of Central Arkansas.
    Disclosures: Financial: Donna Thomas is an assistant professor in the Department of Health and Human Sciences at Southeastern Louisiana University. Dee M. Lance is an associate professor in the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders at the University of Central Arkansas.×
  • Nonfinancial: Donna Thomas and Dee M. Lance have previously published in the area of literacy.
    Nonfinancial: Donna Thomas and Dee M. Lance have previously published in the area of literacy.×
Article Information
Development / School-Based Settings / Normal Language Processing / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Articles
Article   |   March 2014
Effects of School-Wide Intervention on Literacy Learning: The SLPs Support
SIG 16 Perspectives on School-Based Issues, March 2014, Vol. 15, 45-53. doi:10.1044/sbi15.1.45
SIG 16 Perspectives on School-Based Issues, March 2014, Vol. 15, 45-53. doi:10.1044/sbi15.1.45

The speech-language pathologist (SLP) who works in an elementary school plays an integral part in the prevention, identification, assessment, and intervention of children who are learning to read and write (American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, 2001). This can be accomplished through the support of an SLP who has specialized knowledge in the areas of phonology and language. Additionally, the Response to Intervention (RTI) framework provides the SLP with the opportunity to contribute specialized service delivery to more than just the student on his/her caseload. The primary goal of this article is to discuss the effects of the team-based model of RTI for kindergarten through third-grade children on a curriculum-based measure and the role of the SLP in this model. To determine the effects of the school-wide model of intervention on literacy skills, a retrospective study of 409 case records was undertaken. The results of dependent t-tests demonstrated that the children made significant gains in phonics, phonemic awareness, and reading fluency skills after a year of intervention.

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