CHARGE Syndrome: An Introduction for Speech-Language Pathologists CHARGE syndrome, identified in 1979 and a gene found in 2004, is a highly variable disorder, making “typical” CHARGE hard to describe. Few children will have all of the characteristic anomalies. Therefore, it is essential to know what the anomalies are and be able to know how the specific child ... Article
Article  |   June 01, 2014
CHARGE Syndrome: An Introduction for Speech-Language Pathologists
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Timothy S. Hartshorne
    Department of Psychology, Central Michigan University, Mount Pleasant, MI
  • Kirsten N. Hissong
    Psychology major, Central Michigan University, Mount Pleasant, MI
  • Disclosure: Financial: Timothy Hartshorne and Kirsten Hissong have no financial interests to disclose:
    Disclosure: Financial: Timothy Hartshorne and Kirsten Hissong have no financial interests to disclose:×
  • Nonfinancial: Timothy Hartshorne and Kirsten Hissong have no financial interests to disclose.
    Nonfinancial: Timothy Hartshorne and Kirsten Hissong have no financial interests to disclose.×
Article Information
Special Populations / Genetic & Congenital Disorders / School-Based Settings / Articles
Article   |   June 01, 2014
CHARGE Syndrome: An Introduction for Speech-Language Pathologists
SIG 16 Perspectives on School-Based Issues, June 2014, Vol. 15, 94-102. doi:10.1044/sbi15.2.94
SIG 16 Perspectives on School-Based Issues, June 2014, Vol. 15, 94-102. doi:10.1044/sbi15.2.94

CHARGE syndrome, identified in 1979 and a gene found in 2004, is a highly variable disorder, making “typical” CHARGE hard to describe. Few children will have all of the characteristic anomalies. Therefore, it is essential to know what the anomalies are and be able to know how the specific child is affected in order to plan well for treatment. Characteristic behaviors, which can be challenging, can be understood as attempts to self-regulate and must be understood. These children manage best in an environment that is predictable. Children with CHARGE are multisensory impaired, which can severely restrict their “communication bubble.” Building communication is essential for children with CHARGE and the role of the speech-language pathologist is critical to their success in life.

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