“He'll Grow out of it Soon—Won't He?”—The Characteristics of Older Children's Speech When They Do—and Don't—Grow out of it Speech sound disorder is a common reason for referral to speech and language therapy services in the early years. While for some children, their difficulties are transitory and they either respond to intervention or their difficulties resolve, for others, their speech sound difficulties evolve into persistent speech disorder (PSD). The ... Article
Article  |   April 01, 2015
“He'll Grow out of it Soon—Won't He?”—The Characteristics of Older Children's Speech When They Do—and Don't—Grow out of it
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Yvonne Wren
    North Bristol NHS Trust, University of the West of England
    University of Bristol, Bristol, UK
  • Disclosures: Financial: Yvonne Wren receives royalties from sales of the Phoneme Factory software series (Phoneme Factory Sound Sorter and Phoneme Factory Phonology Screener) and from the book ‘Creating Evidence Based Practice: A guide for speech and language therapists’, published by JR Press.
    Disclosures: Financial: Yvonne Wren receives royalties from sales of the Phoneme Factory software series (Phoneme Factory Sound Sorter and Phoneme Factory Phonology Screener) and from the book ‘Creating Evidence Based Practice: A guide for speech and language therapists’, published by JR Press.×
  • Non-financial: Yvonne Wren is a collaborator with the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children population study of child development and health.
    Non-financial: Yvonne Wren is a collaborator with the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children population study of child development and health.×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Special Populations / School-Based Settings / Articles
Article   |   April 01, 2015
“He'll Grow out of it Soon—Won't He?”—The Characteristics of Older Children's Speech When They Do—and Don't—Grow out of it
SIG 16 Perspectives on School-Based Issues, April 2015, Vol. 16, 25-36. doi:10.1044/sbi16.2.25
SIG 16 Perspectives on School-Based Issues, April 2015, Vol. 16, 25-36. doi:10.1044/sbi16.2.25

Speech sound disorder is a common reason for referral to speech and language therapy services in the early years. While for some children, their difficulties are transitory and they either respond to intervention or their difficulties resolve, for others, their speech sound difficulties evolve into persistent speech disorder (PSD). The purpose of this article is to provide information on the features of PSD and how to assess children with PSD in order to identify the full range and limits of their speech sound system. Reference is made to ALSPAC, a large longitudinal population study, regarding prevalence, possible subtypes, and risk factors for PSD.

Acknowledgements
We are extremely grateful to all the families who took part in ALSPAC, the midwives for their help in recruiting them, and the whole ALSPAC team, which includes interviewers, computer and laboratory technicians, clerical workers, research scientists, volunteers, managers, receptionists, and nurses. We are particularly grateful to the “speech team” who collected the speech and language data at the three time points. We are most grateful for Steven Long's assistance which enabled us to use Computerized Profiling and to Professor Lawrence Shriberg for his guidance in the early stages of the ALSPAC study.
The UK Medical Research Council, the Wellcome Trust and the University of Bristol provide core support for ALSPAC. The research using ALSPAC data reported in this paper was specifically funded by the Medical Research Council, UK.
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