After Dismissal: Examining the Language, Literacy, and Cognitive Skills of Children With Remediated Speech Sound Disorders Speech sound disorders are a complex and often persistent disorder in young children. For many children, therapy results in successful remediation of the errored productions as well as age-appropriate literacy and academic progress. However, for some children, while they may attain age-appropriate speech production skills, they later have academic difficulties. ... Article
Article  |   April 01, 2015
After Dismissal: Examining the Language, Literacy, and Cognitive Skills of Children With Remediated Speech Sound Disorders
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Kelly Farquharson
    Emerson College, Boston, MA
  • Disclosure: Financial: Kelly Farquharson has no financial interests to disclose.
    Disclosure: Financial: Kelly Farquharson has no financial interests to disclose.×
  • Nonfinancial: Kelly Farquharson has no nonfinancial interests to disclose.
    Nonfinancial: Kelly Farquharson has no nonfinancial interests to disclose.×
Article Information
Development / Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / School-Based Settings / Normal Language Processing / Articles
Article   |   April 01, 2015
After Dismissal: Examining the Language, Literacy, and Cognitive Skills of Children With Remediated Speech Sound Disorders
SIG 16 Perspectives on School-Based Issues, April 2015, Vol. 16, 50-59. doi:10.1044/sbi16.2.50
History: Received January 9, 2015 , Accepted January 15, 2015
SIG 16 Perspectives on School-Based Issues, April 2015, Vol. 16, 50-59. doi:10.1044/sbi16.2.50
History: Received January 9, 2015; Accepted January 15, 2015

Speech sound disorders are a complex and often persistent disorder in young children. For many children, therapy results in successful remediation of the errored productions as well as age-appropriate literacy and academic progress. However, for some children, while they may attain age-appropriate speech production skills, they later have academic difficulties. For SLPs in the public schools, these children present as challenging in terms of both continuing treatment as well as in terms of caseload management. What happens after dismissal? Have these children truly acquired adequate speech production skills? Do they have lingering language, literacy, and cognitive deficits? The purpose of this article is to describe the language, literacy, and cognitive features of a small group of children with remediated speech sound disorders compared to their typically developing peers.

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