Conducting an Augmentative and Alternative Communication Assessment as a School-Based Speech-Language Pathologist: A Collaborative Experience In addition to providing services to children who demonstrate speech and language impairments, it is within a speech-language pathologist's (SLP's) scope of practice to “recognize and hold paramount the needs and interests of individuals who may benefit from AAC [Augmentative and Alternative Communication]” (American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA), 2005, Position Statement ... Article
Article  |   August 01, 2015
Conducting an Augmentative and Alternative Communication Assessment as a School-Based Speech-Language Pathologist: A Collaborative Experience
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Janet Dodd
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, Chapman University, Orange, CA
  • Alicia Schaefer
    Speech-Language Specialists, Santa Ana Unified School District, Santa Ana, CA
  • Aaron Rothbart
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, Chapman University, Orange, CA
  • Disclosure: Financial: Janet Dodd, Alicia Schaefer, and Aaron Rothbart have no financial interests to disclose.
    Disclosure: Financial: Janet Dodd, Alicia Schaefer, and Aaron Rothbart have no financial interests to disclose.×
  • Nonfinancial: Janet Dodd, Alicia Schaefer, and Aaron Rothbart have no nonfinancial interests to disclose.
    Nonfinancial: Janet Dodd, Alicia Schaefer, and Aaron Rothbart have no nonfinancial interests to disclose.×
Article Information
Augmentative & Alternative Communication / School-Based Settings / Articles
Article   |   August 01, 2015
Conducting an Augmentative and Alternative Communication Assessment as a School-Based Speech-Language Pathologist: A Collaborative Experience
SIG 16 Perspectives on School-Based Issues, August 2015, Vol. 16, 105-117. doi:10.1044/sbi16.3.105
History: Received April 20, 2015 , Revised May 15, 2015 , Accepted May 16, 2015
SIG 16 Perspectives on School-Based Issues, August 2015, Vol. 16, 105-117. doi:10.1044/sbi16.3.105
History: Received April 20, 2015; Revised May 15, 2015; Accepted May 16, 2015

In addition to providing services to children who demonstrate speech and language impairments, it is within a speech-language pathologist's (SLP's) scope of practice to “recognize and hold paramount the needs and interests of individuals who may benefit from AAC [Augmentative and Alternative Communication]” (American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA), 2005, Position Statement section, para. 3). However, in spite of nearly one-half of all school-based SLPs reporting they provide services to nonverbal students who utilize AAC systems (ASHA 2012; Kent-Walsh, Stark, & Binger, 2008; Proctor & Oswalt, 2008) many SLPs across the country still do not feel adequately trained to assess and provide therapy services to these children (Costigan & Light, 2010; Kent-Walsh et al., 2008; Light, Drager, Currall, & Roberts, 2012). It is becoming increasingly necessary for all SLPs to assume responsibilities in the AAC process. The case study presented in this article illustrates the collaborative process of conducting an AAC assessment for a preschool-aged child.

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