Phonological Patterns in Dominican Spanish-English Bilingual Preschoolers: Implications for Assessment Spanish dialects are either conservative or radical. The phonology of Conservative (e.g., Mexican) dialects remains close to the spelling (e.g., /dos/ “two” ➝ [dos]). Radical Spanish (e.g., Puerto Rican dialect) dialects vary significantly in their syllable structure (e.g., /dos/ [do]). Few studies have researched radical dialects, and the studies ... Article
Article  |   August 01, 2015
Phonological Patterns in Dominican Spanish-English Bilingual Preschoolers: Implications for Assessment
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Marissa Taveras
    School of Communication Disorders & Deafness, Kean University, Union, NJ
  • Mahchid Namazi
    School of Communication Disorders & Deafness, Kean University, Union, NJ
  • Lia Pazuelo
    School of Communication Disorders & Deafness, Kean University, Union, NJ
  • Laura Casado
    School of Communication Disorders & Deafness, Kean University, Union, NJ
  • Disclosures: Financial: Marissa Taveras, Mahchid Namazi, Lia Pazuelo, and Laura Casado have no relevant financial interests to disclose.
    Disclosures: Financial: Marissa Taveras, Mahchid Namazi, Lia Pazuelo, and Laura Casado have no relevant financial interests to disclose.×
  • Nonfinancial: The data have been partially presented as a poster presentation at the New Jersey Speech Language Hearing Convention and at the ASHA 2013 Convention.
    Nonfinancial: The data have been partially presented as a poster presentation at the New Jersey Speech Language Hearing Convention and at the ASHA 2013 Convention.×
Article Information
Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / School-Based Settings / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Articles
Article   |   August 01, 2015
Phonological Patterns in Dominican Spanish-English Bilingual Preschoolers: Implications for Assessment
SIG 16 Perspectives on School-Based Issues, August 2015, Vol. 16, 87-98. doi:10.1044/sbi16.3.87
History: Received September 9, 2014 , Revised May 8, 2015 , Accepted May 9, 2015
SIG 16 Perspectives on School-Based Issues, August 2015, Vol. 16, 87-98. doi:10.1044/sbi16.3.87
History: Received September 9, 2014; Revised May 8, 2015; Accepted May 9, 2015

Spanish dialects are either conservative or radical. The phonology of Conservative (e.g., Mexican) dialects remains close to the spelling (e.g., /dos/ “two” ➝ [dos]). Radical Spanish (e.g., Puerto Rican dialect) dialects vary significantly in their syllable structure (e.g., /dos/ Image Not Available [do]). Few studies have researched radical dialects, and the studies that have only examined Puerto Rican Spanish (e.g., Anderson & Smith, 1987; Goldstein, Fabiano, & Washington, 2005; Goldstein & Iglesias, 1996). We could not locate any studies on the Dominican dialect of Spanish-English bilinguals, a group quickly becoming the number one Spanish community in New York and New Jersey (United States Census Bureau, n.d.). Our purpose was to investigate the phonological patterns of Dominican Spanish in bilingual children. Phonological processes were analyzed for five 3-year-old and five 4-year-old Dominican children. Word-level analyses were made and compared to Goldstein & Iglesias' 1996  study of phonological patterns found in typically developing, Puerto Rican Spanish-English speaking preschoolers. Our results indicated that liquid simplification and cluster reduction were the most commonly occurring phonological processes, whereas stopping, weak syllable deletion, velar fronting, assimilation, and palatal fronting were less commonly occurring. Implications for assessment and limitations are discussed.

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